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About

Our school originally opened as a Long Valley School in 1871 serving students living in Doyle, California. The building was destroyed by a fire in 1946 and soon after reopened. In 1968, the school moved to a new building, which is its current location.

Long Valley School underwent a conversion to a charter school in 2000 with the support of community, staff members and the families it serves. In 2010, at the time of renewal, Long Valley Charter School became sponsored by the State Board of Education.

We are a public school with charter school status.  What does that mean? 
Learn more by visiting www.publiccharters.org

Our "Charter" or agreement with our sponsor, the State Board of Education provides detailed information about our philosophy, educational program and much more.
Learn more by viewing our Charter.

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It is our privilege, as an educational community, to help each child achieve his/her highest potential, to provide opportunities for self-discovery, and to prepare students for the challenges of a rapidly changing world.

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The mission of Long Valley Charter School is to equip its students with the knowledge and skills to be successful, responsible and intelligent participants of a global society. It is our goal to provide an educational foundation that includes mastery of academic content, independent thinking, creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration; thus, to best prepare students for a future yet to be imagined. 

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Who can enroll?

Long Valley Charter School offers public education for TK to 12th grade students in Lassen, Plumas, Sierra, Shasta and Modoc counties. There are Personalized Learning and classroom-based programs available.

Is there a tuition fee?

Despite Long Valley’s innovative and personalized education methods, the school does not have to charge for a quality education. As a public charter school, Long Valley’s programs are open to all, free of charge. “People often think charters are a private school because of our flexibility andwhat we’re able to do,” says Director Sherri Morgan. “But we are a publicly funded, California school.”

Why was Long Valley Founded?

The school’s founders decided that a flexible education experience better fit the needs of the area’s students.
“I used to teach in regular classrooms, responsible for 150 students each day,” Sherri Morgan, Long Valley's Director says. “I could see that kiddo in the third seat of the fourth row wasn’t getting it, and I had no time to help him because I had the whole group. So that opportunity to individualize does allow you to reach every kid.”

Do students receive a rigorous education?

Long Valley has gone above and beyond to design a curriculum that exceeds requirements. We sought and received accreditation for K-12 are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. We offer a rigorous program and we encourage you to come and learn more.

What makes Long Valley unique?

Small class sizes and common goals breed a tight-knit community that invites parental involvement. There is a strong community feel when we have any event. We have the opportunities for further involvement like membership in site committees, field trip chaperones and volunteering at school. We encourage our parents to become collaborative partners in our school and leaders within our community.

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Each student who attends Long Valley Charter School does so on a voluntary basis, and the program appeals to all people. The Long Valley Charter School implemented a student and employee recruitment strategy that included, but is not limited to the following elements to ensure a racial and ethnic balance that is reflective of the general population residing within the territorial jurisdiction of the District:
  • Promotional and informational materials that appeal to all of the various and ethnic groups represented in the district.
  • Development of the above materials in languages other than English to appeal to populations with limited English proficiency.
  • The service of Spanish speaking staff, when available, to facilitate communication for limited English proficient parents and community members.
  • Implementation of a translating program to convert English to Spanish for the purpose of written Charter School communication.
The outreach plan will be regularly reviewed and revised as necessary to ensure racial and ethnic balance.